Dining Out and Keto – Featuring Denny’s

#dennyswherever

Easy Keto Wherever

I think one of the most valuable lessons when learning to adopt a Keto lifestyle is understanding just how simple it is to eat this way in the many restaurants you find. Denny’s is a perfect example. It is not the kind of establishment that you would consider if you were looking for healthy meal options, and yet, with a few strategic choices, you can absolutely have a healthy, keto-friendly meal.

Breakfast on the Run Does Not Have to be Carb-Fueled

Case in point, while on my summer road trip through New England, I stopped here for breakfast. I had a cheese omelet, bacon, sausage, unsweetened tea, and black coffee. It was filling, delicious, relatively inexpensive, and perfectly acceptable for the keto diet.

As you can see, with relatively minor tweaks, keeping to a low carb, high fat keto diet is easy no matter where you are.

Want to learn more about the Keto Diet? Check out my books on Amazon:

Ketosis Diet: Lose Up To 25 Pounds in a Month: https://amzn.to/2TvNGrY 

Easy 7 Day Keto Meal Plan https://amzn.to/2D5aUya

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Conquering Bad Habits

If I have discovered one thing over the past couple of years, it is that battling lethargy is a constant challenge. 

It is so hard to conquer bad habits. The reason for this is that you have your routine, and in order to change this, you must engage your mind and make strategic decisions. That is not to say it is impossible – it isn’t – but it does take effort. 

For me, going on the keto diet was very easy. I finally had made up my mind to take care of myself, and I haven’t looked back. If I occasionally overindulge, I am able to bring it back. Through affirmations and dedication, I have created my new routines. 

The one that I have difficulty with, though, is writing. I allow myself to get distracted. I’ll sit down to write, then answer a text, or the dogs will whine to go out, or I’ll open my computer game. I’ll go so far as to open WordPress, but then get distracted optimizing old blog posts.  

The other thing that I do is write in my journal, and that tends to sap my creative energies. I battle with what to share and what to keep to myself. If it’s too personal, I refrain from developing the thought for public consumption, yet authenticity draws attention. 

While I was away in St Thomas, it was easy for me to be clear about my goals. I had plenty of time to flesh out my plans and avoid distraction. Since I had terrible WiFi access, I couldn’t waste endless hours playing video games. Even my social media was limited to posting for my blog. Since returning home, though, it takes a colossal effort to write. 

I wonder if there is ever a perfect time to write. In truth, there isn’t. Like with anything, I must focus and dedicate time and effort, without distraction, to do this. It is time to create a new routine. 

Seeds of Potential

Growth, Travel, Freedom
Growth, Travel, Freedom
Seeds offer potential life. For me, it is personal growth and travel.

I woke this morning and realized that one of my avocados was getting dangerously ripe. I just cut off a small portion of the top and ate straight from the rind. When I got to the pit, I pulled it out, washed it off, then placed it with the others I have sitting next to my sink. I already have planted one, and there are only so many that you can realistically grow at any given point, so I just collect them. It suddenly struck me – I can’t throw them away!

Continue reading “Seeds of Potential”

Our Time in St Thomas is Coming to an End

I am in the final week of my month in St Thomas, and I am sad to see our time here coming to an end. It has been incredibly restorative to my soul.

Before I left for this trip, I was feeling run down and unsettled. I felt trapped and without purpose.

Since being away from my routine, I have found a new direction and I am eager to return stateside if only to implement my plans.

I have also been without WiFi for at least half of my time. At best, telephone and internet service is spotty and erratic. In the places we have stayed, we “had” WiFi, but for various, usually weather-related reasons, we have had long periods without.

I am actually writing this post on my mobile phone. I am laying across my roommate’s bed, right next to the open sliding door, which we have determined is the most sustained signal in the house.

Being so disconnected has been akin to detoxing. It has been unpleasant and unsettling. I have tried to take a stoic approach to it all. Keeping a good sense of humor is required.

I have spent my time journaling, massaging, playing tourist, helping out my hosts, taking pictures, and trying to figure out my plan.

I have also determined that a month away is about perfect. The first two weeks of a trip, you are just trying to get your bearings. There is a lot of activity.

By week three, you begin transitioning into the daily grind. Vendors start to recognize you. Locals start to wave. You really start getting a feel for what it would be like to live there.

Now, I am in the final 7 days, and I find that I am ready to implement the plans I have developed in my time away. I cannot say that I am eager to leave, but I feel like I am returning to my homebase, rather than my prison.

I have also discovered that I need to go somewhere about once every 6-8 weeks. If I don’t get out of town, I start getting restless and rundown.

I am a blessed woman. I have finally been able to arrange my life to allow this freedom. I live out of a suitcase, have few possessions, and have a salary that would make many cringe, yet I have never been happier. My heart and soul is bursting with love and gratitude for the amazing people I have met and places that I have seen.

Rainbow over the water in St Thomas, Virgin Islands.

Embracing Minimalism

I overheard my girlfriend referring to me as a minimalist last night, and for some reason, that struck me as funny. I suppose it is because I have never really consciously embraced that. Yet, I look at the choices I have made over the past couple of years, and I realize that is exactly what I have become.

At this moment, I am sitting at a cafe in St Thomas drinking a carton of coconut water. My small backpack is sitting next to me. I have two mobile phones on my right. They are both prepaid. One has a dual SIM slot so I can connect both at home and abroad. I have a small leather journal, my Passport, and a basic black leather purse. I have embraced minimalism due to necessity.

I came to St Thomas for a working vacation about 2 weeks ago with a small carry-on. I have about 6 wrap dresses with me and 2 sets of yoga pants. I have a pair of flip-flops, tennis shoes, and dress shoes. Believe it or not, I have not worn all of the things I have with me! I am realizing how little I actually need to survive.

As I packed for my trip, I was thinking about my German lover. He travels worldwide for work and has a basic uniform that he wears, which is simply jeans and black tee shirts. He can carry all he needs in a backpack. As an  American woman from the South, many of my outfits are colorful and lightweight, but I have been thinking more and more about toning down my style a bit. When black is your basic palette, you can travel without undue attention.

Amazingly, I do not miss “home.” In all honesty, I do not really feel I have a place called home. I am from South Carolina originally, but I was raised in Utah and Florida. I have traveled all over the United States and the world. I have family and friends worldwide. I love meeting people and experiencing their world. When I travel, I never want a tour of the famous sites. I want to live like a local for the duration of my visit. I want to know what the good and bad is in any given area.

I have been pondering my next steps after St Thomas, and I feel a plan coming together. What I know is this – I am a gypsy at heart. I have done my part to raise my children in a stable environment, and now I am free to indulge in the spirit that has been patiently awaiting release for years. Maybe in all of my wanderings, I will finally find a home. I am discovering that home is not a place, though. As a minimalist, home is within my soul, and the rest is simply geography.